Learning and the Brain

These books include recent insights from neuroscience that may be VERY new to you.

Brain Rules:
12 Principles for Surviving at Work, Home, and School.
2nd expanded edition.

John Medina (2014) - 304 pages - new $11.02
https://www.amazon.com/Brain-Rules-Updated-Expanded-Principles/dp/098326337X/

John Medina is founding director of two brain research institutes. In this book he takes neuroscience discoveries and makes them accessible through example and humor to everyone. This is a fast read and a very important book by a talented and funny communicator. HIGHLY RECOMMENDED!

How We Learn: the surprising truth about when, where, and why it happens.
Benedict Carey. (2015) - 272 pages - new $10.76
https://www.amazon.com/How-We-Learn-Surprising-Happens/dp/0812984293

Carey focuses on what modern research tells us about learning. Readers love the book and are amazed at what it teaches them about their own learning. It's like an owner's manual for your learning brain.

Drive:  The surprising truth about what motivates us.
Daniel Pink. (2011) - 288 pages - new $9.52
https://www.amazon.com/Drive-Surprising-Truth-About-Motivates/dp/1594484805/

The desire to learn differentiates a successful from an unsuccessful student. Many teachers use external (extrinsic) "carrots" like privileges, badges, stickers, and even grades to encourage students to engage in their schoolwork. Dan Pink simply and clearly explains when that is likely to be successful and when it may be counterproductive. It can actually harm student learning in the long term. A quick read, superbly written, and hugely important. HIGHLY RECOMMENDED.

A Whole New Mind: Why right-brainers will rule the future.
Daniel Pink (2006) - 304 pages - new $9.83
https://www.amazon.com/Whole-New-Mind-Right-Brainers-Future/dp/1594481717/

Educators have prized "correct" answers for millenia, but factual knowledge was rare then. In today's Google world, knowledge is cheap, abundant, and not worth much on the job market. Instead, a different kind of thinking is prized. Entrepreneurs and employees who can be innovative, who can solve problems creatively, are highly valued. Dan Pink suggests that "left-brain" thinking is what schools usually promote and reward, but that "whole-brain" thinking is what will help our kids succeed in their future careers. This is an important book for your own as well as your students' learning. Well written and easy to read. HIGHLY RECOMMENDED.